Looking for the Wndsn store? This way, please: Limited editions tools and embroidered morale patches from the Wndsn Expedition Team.

The Wndsn Legend

Science and mythology of the Norseman.


The Wndsn Logo Story

Q: The Wndsn logo is ever-changing; why is that?

A: The Wndsn logo is not a fixed mark in the contemporary sense of commercial brand logotypes, but instead, it is a heraldic-like[1] sign where the appearance is based on the description "Norseman; son of strong winds and the sea" which has its roots in the blazoning[2] of coats of arms; "a strong wind from the north" as the upper part and a symbolic representation for "first son", origin, foundation, etc. This can take on various visual shapes, with the elements still recognizable and still depcting the same described attributes. We are using the various versions concurrently, some items lend themselves more to the viking bind-rune style while other applications call for the 1920s, European ligature-logotype. There will be more versions in the future, depending on context, as well as materials and techniques being used.

Compare the description of the very first Wndsn logo embroidered patch:

The reflective Wndsn, one-piece toolmark, consisting of the meteorological symbol for strong wind from the north, and the Greek letter upsilon, a heraldic representation of the first born son, itself cut like a blade, is emerging from a black square, the shadows, symbolized in a material that only reflects perpendicular to the observer and is flooding its surroundings, thereby concealing them.

Wndsn: Logo Story

The logos:

  • The very first (and never used) "full dress" logo
  • The maker's mark in the ligature logotype style
  • The single-path toolmark for stamping metal
  • The geometrical, straight lines-only bindrune

As a collector's note, since this question comes up, none of the versions you have on various items is being deprecated; they are all in use, concurrently, and all based on the very same blazoning.


See also:

References:

  1. Heraldry encompasses all of the duties of a herald, including the practice of devising, granting, and displaying as well as the science and art of designing, describing and recording coats of arms and badges, as well as the formal ceremonies and laws that regulate the use and inheritance of arms. Officers of arms (Kings of Arms, Heralds and Pursuviants) practice heraldry and also rule on questions of rank or protocol. 
  2. In heraldry and heraldic vexillology, a blazon is a formal description of a coat of arms, flag or similar emblem, from which the reader can reconstruct the appropriate image. The verb to blazon means to create such a description.